As the unrelenting city summer finally gives way to a cooler fall, it’s just about the right time to tackle some outdoor projects and consider the pretty little plants above. They’re the source of one of the most reliably simple and time tested wood treatments in the wooden house owners arsenal of upkeep and repair. This treatment also happens to be one of the most sustainable and earth-friendly wood finishes. Oh, and did I mention, it’s also easy on the wallet?

More on this wonder-product, after the jump…

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by Chelcey Berryhill

After writing about the soon-to-be loss on 11th Street and 4th Avenue, you can bet we’re excited to see not one but TWO wooden houses up for public hearings this week at the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). Although we may be a bit biased here at the Wooden House Project, I must say these houses are quite deserving of the individual landmark status!

Here is what the LPC has to say about them >

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Today’s “Then & Now” features some lovely porches & spindles on Dean Street near the corner of 4th Avenue in 1929.

But how about today?

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Spindles add whimsy to wooden houses in the South Slope, Fort Greene, Greenwood Heights and Clinton Hill

Spindles = Instant Gingerbread! We’re in love with many things about today’s featured house at 223 Washington Avenue, but the small architectural details on its facade truly make the house special. The small covered entranceway is decorated with a ribbon of beautiful spindle work, giving it an added layer of pure whimsy. The ornamental use of spindles along porches and railings became popular during the Victorian era and was found in homes designed in the Eastlake and Queen Anne styles.

Where can I find some of these beauties?

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Clinton Hill! We love it. Mansions. Villas. Carriages houses. Wooden houses galore. Recently we climbed a steep stoop to spend a rainy Saturday morning inside one of the most interesting of the bunch: 223 Washington Avenue, near the corner of Willoughby. Lately we can’t seem to stop comparing these shingled houses to sweets. Built ca. 1850 and originally occupied by a flour merchant named Billings Wheeler (which we think is a fantastic name), the house is just an all-around delight, inside and out!

And now, a peek inside!