1925

by Lisa Santoro

Recently, while browsing the New York Public Library’s fantastic photo gallery, I discovered a picture of my beloved Marine Park taken in 1925 with a caption that read “part of one of Brooklyn’s largest developments.” I am very familiar with this row of houses and the scores of others that look just like them; having grown up in Marine Park, I have walked by them almost daily for most of my life.

I live in a wooden house and I didn’t even know it! >

2

by Chelcey Berryhill

After writing about the soon-to-be loss on 11th Street and 4th Avenue, you can bet we’re excited to see not one but TWO wooden houses up for public hearings this week at the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). Although we may be a bit biased here at the Wooden House Project, I must say these houses are quite deserving of the individual landmark status!

Here is what the LPC has to say about them >

duffield-street

Finding beautiful wood-frames in Brooklyn? Follow us on instagram and #woodenhouseproject

What’s happening in the world of wooden houses and everything in between:

70 Lefferts Place [Brownstoner]
13th Street, Sold? [Rutenberg Realty]
Fallen Tree, Schmallen Tree [CWB Architects]
Beautiful interior renovation of a frame house — wondering what the exterior looks like! [NY Mag]
…and we’re anxiously waiting to know how the  Milktrout kitchen in Gowanus is shaping up [theSweeten]

Over the river and through the woods….

In My Dreams [Big Old Houses]
The Arlington Italianate House [This Old House]
Dreaming of strolling through Savannah… [Savannah Secrets]
Rescue Me: 52 Chambers Street [Newburgh Restoration]
Living in a 1912 Schoolhouse [Dwell]

frontview

Clinton Hill! We love it. Mansions. Villas. Carriages houses. Wooden houses galore. Recently we climbed a steep stoop to spend a rainy Saturday morning inside one of the most interesting of the bunch: 223 Washington Avenue, near the corner of Willoughby. Lately we can’t seem to stop comparing these shingled houses to sweets. Built ca. 1850 and originally occupied by a flour merchant named Billings Wheeler (which we think is a fantastic name), the house is just an all-around delight, inside and out!

And now, a peek inside!

windsor

In preparation for an upcoming post, we asked a big question on Facebook today.

What is your favorite wooden house in Brooklyn?

Head on over to Facebook to join the discussion!